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Bible Encyclopedias

Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature

Access

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(προσαγωγή , a bringing toward) is the privilege of approaching a superior with freedom. It is distinguished from admittance thus: "We have admittance where we enter; we have access to him whom we address. There can be no access where there is no admittance; but there may be admittance without access. Servants or officers may grant us admittance into the palaces of princes; the favorites of princes only have access to their persons" (Crabbe, Engl. Syn. s.v.). (See ACCEPTANCE).

1. Introduction, free admission into the presence of a superior. In the New Testament it signifies the free intercourse which we enjoy with God in the exercise of prayer, resulting from our having entered into a state of friendship with him (Romans 5:2; Ephesians 2:18; Ephesians 3:12). It is more than simple admittance; it is such an introduction as leads to future and frequent intercourse. When the vail of the temple was rent at the death of Christ, a new and living way of access to God was opened. Under the law, the high-priest alone had access into the holy of holies. By the death of Christ the middle wall of partition was broken down, and Jew and Gentile have both free access to God; before this, the Gentiles, in the temple- worship, had no nearer access than to the gate of the court of Israel. All the privileges of Christianity are equally bestowed on all believers of all nations. (See PRAYER).

2. In Roman ecclesiastical usage

(1.) a collection of preparatory prayers, used by the priests before the celebration of the mass;

(2.) in the election of the pope, a transfer of votes from one candidate to another to secure the necessary number is called an access. If a voter wishes to change his vote to another person, he writes on his paper accedo domino, etc.

Access (Communion prayer)

the name given to the prayer, in the Communion office, beginning with the words "We do not presume to come to this thy table."

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Bibliography Information
McClintock, John. Strong, James. Entry for 'Access'. Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ecclesiastical Literature. https://www.studylight.org/encyclopedias/eng/tce/a/access.html. Harper & Brothers. New York. 1870.

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