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Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Tuesday, January 25

1366
Death in Ulm, Germany, of Henry Suso, a fanatical ascetic and mystic, who practiced austerities and tortures on himself as penance for twenty-two years. For example, he bound a wooden cross to his back, in which he affixed thirty spikes in memory of Christ's wounds. On this instrument of torture he stretched himself at night for eight years.
1534
German Reformer Martin Luther gave his understanding of "conversion" in a sermon: 'To be converted to God means to believe in Christ, to believe that He is our Mediator and that we have eternal life through Him.'
1841
The Oxford Movement in England reached its apex with the appearance of John Henry Newman's Tract No. 90. The storm of controversy which ensued brought the series (begun in 1833) to an end. Later, Newman resigned his Anglican parish and in 1845 converted to Roman Catholicism.
1907
Death in Wisconsin of Onangwatgo [Cornelius Hill], an Oneida chief and Episcopal priest.
1922
Death in England of Madame Tchertkoff, a Russian evangelical noblewoman whose estates and mission buildings had been confiscated by the Bolsheviks when she was eighty-five years old. She had escaped to Finland and from there to England. When she had sold a property she owned in England, the new owners kindly allowed her to live there the remainder of her life.
1944
Florence Li Tim-Oi is ordained a priest in Hong Kong by Anglican bishop Ronald Hall, the first woman ordained a priest in the Anglican communion.
1959
Death in South Africa of Walter Lefa Mochochoko, who had been a notable leader in the Anglican Church of South Africa, and then a bishop in the African Church. He had spoken out vigorously against the racism practiced in churches.
1980
Frederick Donald Coggan, Archbishop of Canterbury, retires. He had been involved in the translation of the New English Bible and was an advocate for the ordination of women.
1986
Death in Toronto of Oswald J. Smith. He had founded the People's Church in Toronto, raised millions of dollars to support missions and written thirty-five books which had been translated into one-hundred-and-twenty-eight languages.
2008
United Christian Women are incorporated into a non-profit organization in Ann Arbor, Michigan, to encourage young women to remain strong in faith.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"