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Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Sunday, November 29

851
Muslims in Spain release Eulogius, a supporter of a number of recent Christian martyrs, but require sureties that he will remain in C
1223
Through publication of "Regula Bullata," Pope Honorius III formally authorized the "Regula Prima," a settled rule of organization and administration for the Franciscan order.
1226
Louis IX of France is crowned at Rheims. Because of the sanctity of his life, he will be declared a saint in 1297, twenty-seven years after his death.
1530
Death of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, who had been Lord Chancellor of England. He says, "If I had served God as diligently as I have done the King, he would not have given me over in my grey hairs."
1643
Death of Renaissance Italian composer and clergyman Claudio Monteverdi, who served as maestro di cappella at St Mark's Cathedral, Venice. An innovator, he developed techniques that flourished in baroque music. He wrote an opera that is still produced, secular madrigals, and many sacred pieces, including several serene masses.
1847
Indians massacre missionary-physician Marcus Whitman and twelve others at Walla Walla. Immigrants had brought measles. Resentment against white incursions came to a head: the natives accused Whitman and other missionaries of black magic and killed them.
1921
Death in Rochester, New York, of Augustus H. Strong, known for his work in systematic theology.
1937
Death of Agnes Ozman, the first student who had spoken in tongues at Charles Parham's Kansas school in 1901, sparking the Pentecostal movement.
1952
The Vatican announces that Archbishop Aloysius Stepanic, under house arrest in Yugoslavia, will be made a cardinal. This infuriates Tito's communist regime which protests vigorously, having convicted Stepanic of war crimes and collaboration with Nazis. The ceremony making Stepanic a cardinal will nonetheless take place on January 12, 1953.
1958
Chinese missionary John Ding and his wife Zhu Yiming are captured by Communists in Tibet where they had been evangelizing. They are incarcerated. Zhu will die before her husband and he will not be notified for three years. Then he will be given her clothes and will find the toes of her shoes and the knee area of her dress are worn out from much prayer on her knees. Released after twenty-three years in prison, Ding will return to preaching and will remarry.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"