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Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Sunday, April 27

304
Pollio is brought before a judge. When he declares he is a church reader, he is burned to death in Gibalea (later a city in Hungary).
1537
Geneva's first Protestant catechism was published. Based on Calvin's "Institutes," it was compiled by John Calvin, 27, and/or by fellow French reformer, Guillaume Farel, 48.
1570
Pope Pius V issues a bull against Queen Elizabeth of England, excommunicating her as "a heretic and favorer of heretics," depriving her of her title to the crown, and forbidding all her subjects to obey her on threat of excommunication themselves. Elizabeth, however, will retain her throne and triumph over an attempted invasion by Catholic Spain, going down in history as one of England's greatest monarchs.
1650
A committee from Devon, England, recommends John Flavel as an assistant to an infirm rector at Diptford. The young man applies himself with much determination, becoming a notable Presbyterian clergyman and Puritan author, often persecuted by the government because his religious views do not conform to those of the Church of England.
1697
F
1775
Death of Moravian missionary Peter Bohler, 63. Commissioned by Count Zinzendorf in 1737, Bohler encountered the as-yet-unsaved John Wesley, no doubt imprinting within him the later Methodist characteristics of crisis conversion, joyful assurance of God's acceptance and a Christian lifestyle of self- surrendering faith.
1832
The American Baptist Home Mission Society was formed in New York City. During its first 15 years, $1.66 million in contributions were raised, 14,426 churches were organized and 1,116 missionaries were sent out.
1946
The Orthodox Church of Ethiopia unanimously elects Meliktu Welde Mariam to become a bishop. In 1971 he will become the first patriarch (Patriarch Tewoflos) ordained in Ethiopia. Previously patriarchs had been ordained in Egypt.
1955
Wanda Fricke, a nurse, arrives in New Guinea to open a medical mission work for the Missouri Synod Lutheran Church. She will also author children's stories.
1960
Police in Nowa Huta, Poland, try to remove a cross. Women protest and men join to protect the women from police brutality. Riots develop and the rioters burn the Communist headquarters. This is one of many religious protests that force the Communists to grant a measure of religious tolerance to Poland. Eventually Polish faith will be a factor in bringing down the Communist regime.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"